Author Topic: Fuel tank quick connect couplings  (Read 1420 times)

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September 28, 2014, 10:29:49 PM on

Offline TR5TRIDER (OP)

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The addiction continues, acquired my fourth Triumph (2nd Tiger) 2 days ago. This one is a 2000 (non running) Tiger has been parked up for a year with broken quick connect at tank side. Broke off flush with tank plate. I tested the broken off chunk w/heated soldering iron and it will melt. So that is a possibility for removing the remaining threaded part. I have read Evil Betty's How To Install New Coupling and it is very informative, thanks EB. The first thing I want to do is remove the female couplings from the tank. Looking for  advice / suggestions for a method to remove the old plastic fittings. Hopefully I can get that sorted out this week and install new metal couplings as per EB's How To then to see if I can make her run.

TR5T Rider

September 29, 2014, 07:13:46 AMReply #1 on

Offline Chris Canning

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I've read as many different ways as their are days in week but I used a small file a triangular worked best just file a V the full length of the female it's not very thick do it gently the moment you feel contact with the metal thread get a screw driver and prise it out,mine snapped it was that brittle and the rest fell out.

September 29, 2014, 09:42:42 PMReply #2 on

Offline TR5TRIDER (OP)

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Thanks Chris. I modified your method as follows and it worked a treat. Took some 14 Ga. steel stock and cut it it to fit between the threads of the metal tank plate that the couplings are fitted to. Next, heated the metal piece with propane torch and inserted into plastic fitting melting the plastic back to the thread peaks. I did this 2 times at 90 deg. This left the plastic fitting remains cut into 4 sections. I then heated the metal piece again and quenched it, inserted it into the grooves melted into the plastic and turned out the remains. Easy and no filings or damage to the threads.

September 29, 2014, 10:01:32 PMReply #3 on

Offline KuzzinKenny

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Thanks Chris. I modified your method as follows and it worked a treat. Took some 14 Ga. steel stock and cut it it to fit between the threads of the metal tank plate that the couplings are fitted to. Next, heated the metal piece with propane torch and inserted into plastic fitting melting the plastic back to the thread peaks. I did this 2 times at 90 deg. This left the plastic fitting remains cut into 4 sections. I then heated the metal piece again and quenched it, inserted it into the grooves melted into the plastic and turned out the remains. Easy and no filings or damage to the threads.

Did i just read "propane torch" and "fuel tank"  :bug_eye :nono

not a good combination !!

KK
In Scotland, there`s no such thing as bad weather - only the wrong clothes !! Billy Connolly
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September 30, 2014, 03:57:46 AMReply #4 on

Offline TR5TRIDER (OP)

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The torch was not in close proximity with the tank. I heated the metal in the shop and took the metal piece/tool outside to where the tank was. Perhaps 25 - 30 feet distant. Just lucky I suppose.

TR5T Rider