Author Topic: Triumph Tiger 955i - Front Wheel Bearing Replacement (2006 cast wheel).  (Read 1402 times)

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April 29, 2015, 11:28:13 PM on

Offline Tiger-G (OP)

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Hi,

Here's a link to a "how to" on removing and replacing the front wheel bearings on a 2006 Tiger 955i (cast wheel), as I couldn't find anything to help me:

http://www.triumphrat.net/tigers-885i-and-955i-mods-and-workshop/565777-triumph-tiger-955i-front-wheel-bearings-replacement-2006-cast-wheel.html

(hope it's ok mentioning "the other site" ??)

Here's a "how to" on removal and replacement of the front wheel bearings on a Triumph Tiger 955i (2006, cast wheel). I couldn't find any info on how to do it on the internet, so I hope this helps others who are going to try it :).
 
I made a few mistakes, so make sure you don't do the same !! :confused: ;)
 
 
Here we go:
 
 
Take the front wheel off.
 
The oil seals just lever off:
 

 
 
Speedo oil seal:
 


Unclip the circlip on the right side:
 

 
 
The speedo drive ring just comes straight out:
 

 
 
You can put a screwdriver in to move the internal spacer slightly off centre, so you can hit the bearing directly, should you need to:
 

 
 
I saw a great tip on YouTube. Use a rawl bolt, just slightly smaller than the inner bearing race, to grip it:
 


Put the rawl bolt in the inner bearing, making sure you don't go anywhere near the internal spacer. Tighten the bolt up using a spanner and some mole grips to stop it spinning:
 

 
 
You really have to give it a good tighten to stop it just falling off when you hit it with the hammer:
 

 
 
Heat the wheel up to expand the metal, makes it easier to get the bearing out:
 

 
 
Turn the wheel over, supporting it on blocks of wood. Use a drift and hammer to hit the underneath of the rawl bolt. Make sure the drift is small enough not to catch or damage the internal spacer:
 

The bearing will pop out, then just slacken the rawl bolt to release. Great tip eh  ;):
 

 
 
Remove the internal spacer:
 

 
 
Now you've got a much larger access hole for the other bearing, heat the wheel again and use a drift and hammer on the inner race to remove the other bearing:
 

 
 
Both bearings out  :):
 


Have a cuppa or a pint, you deserve a break !!  :beerchug
 
Give both sides a meticulous clean:
 

 

 
 
This is where I made my mistakes, by not thinking far enough ahead. I'd had my bearings in the freezer most of the day to contract them for easier fitment. I should have had a socket, or something of that ilk, slightly smaller than the outer race of the bearing that would fit straight in the hole without catching when I pressed the new bearing in. I just used the old bearing as a press. And guess what.........yes..........it was an interference fit so it couldn't be used to press the bearing fully home - Doh !! :confused:
 
Sooooo............by the time I'd used the hairdryer to heat the wheel, got the bearing out of the freezer and took it into the garage, put it in place on the wheel and used the old bearing to hit it home with a hammer I was in trouble !!:
 

 
 
I used the old bearing to fully cover the new one and hit it home with a hammer. As the new bearing was nearly fully home, the old bearing started to stick in the hole too - Doh !!:
 


As you can see from the pic, this side goes quite far in the wheel (past the circlip groove), so don't use the old bearing to hit it home or it'll get stuck. I'm sure you already know, you can only hit the outer race, not the inner race, and not the rubber seal, as it will damage the bearing. So Graeme's top tip is to get a socket slightly smaller than the outer diameter of the bearing race so it can be pulled back out:
 

 
 
You will know the bearing is fully in place when the the tapping noise goes from a "knock" to a "ping". Put the circlip back on:
 

 
 
DO NOT FORGET TO PUT THE INTERNAL SPACER IN !!  :eek: :
 

 


Time for the other side. Heat the wheel, get the bearing out of the freezer, and tap it home. You can use the old bearing this time, as the new one sits slightly proud:
 

 
 
Again, this is where I think I made another mistake. When I was hitting the bearing home with the hammer, I think I hit it a bit too far in, as when I came to check the rotation of the bearings afterwards, it was obvious it was tight flush against the internal spacer making a bit of resistence in the rotation. And, I think when I was hitting the new bearing in, I was slightly off centre on the first few blows and the bearing started off slightly wonky (damage ??). And.........I hit my bloody thumb with the hammer OUCH !! - DOH (again):
 

 
 
Bearing fully home, slightly raised fromt the internal surface. If I did it again, I would check the internal spacer was slightly loose on the inside as i tapped slowly. I think this would make the bearings rotate more freely ??:
 


Put the speedo drive ring back in the correct way:
 

 

 
 
Put the new dust seals in. They just push home, no need for a hammer (I just like hitting things, apart from my thumb !!):
 
 
 

 


And that's it. Job's a good 'un !!
 
It's a big thumbs up from me  :thumbsup
 

 
 
OUCH, that's gotta hurt !!  :D
 
 
I haven't ridden the bike yet, and I'm a bit worried about the bearings not rotating as freely as they should. I wonder if the friction of the wheel going round will burn the grease inside, causing them to fail ??  No doubt I'll find out soon  :eek:.
 
If I have hit the bearings too far in, so that they are too snug against the internal spacer, I will just replace them, they're cheap enough. I learnt a lot about how to do the job, so will put up a "how to" for the rear wheel as well.
 
Hope this helps others when tackling this job, it's easy enough if you plan far enough ahead, lol  :)
 
Cheers,
Graeme  :beerchug
 
(anyone got a plaster ??)

Safe Riding.

Regards,
Graeme.

April 29, 2015, 11:56:30 PMReply #1 on

Offline Mustang

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if it's your write up .........post it here . I'll make it a sticky thread,

April 30, 2015, 01:49:43 PMReply #2 on

Offline Tiger-G (OP)

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Hi Mustang,

It took me a couple of hours to do on "the other site". Not sure I can go through that again, lol !!

Yep, I'll sort it when I get a bit of time. Do you know if the photo's will just copy straight across, or will I have to go back into photobucket to do it ??

Cheers,
Graeme.
Safe Riding.

Regards,
Graeme.

April 30, 2015, 02:32:29 PMReply #3 on

Offline Mustang

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If you quote yourself on that ratty site then copy and paste it here ,it works just fine ................

Quote from: Tiger-G;6297601
Here's a "how to" on removal and replacement of the front wheel bearings on a Triumph Tiger 955i (2006, cast wheel). I couldn't find any info on how to do it on the internet, so I hope this helps others who are going to try it :).
 
I made a few mistakes, so make sure you don't do the same !! :confused: ;)
 
 
Here we go:
 
 
Take the front wheel off.
 
The oil seals just lever off:
 

 
 
Speedo oil seal:
 

April 30, 2015, 02:42:02 PMReply #4 on

Offline Tiger-G (OP)

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Safe Riding.

Regards,
Graeme.

April 30, 2015, 02:48:04 PMReply #5 on

Offline Mustang

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did it for you
took me about two minutes.......................... :nod

April 30, 2015, 03:12:09 PMReply #6 on

Offline Tiger-G (OP)

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Thanks for sorting that Mustang, will put the rear wheel one on when I get a bit of spare time   :eusa_clap
Safe Riding.

Regards,
Graeme.

April 04, 2017, 11:14:46 AMReply #7 on

Offline VABird

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For reinstallation, Jack-Be-Quick sells a custom made bearing driver.
Sockets can damage the bearings and old bearings get stuck.

 http://jack-be-quick.com/products/specialty-tools/

May 12, 2017, 04:29:19 PMReply #8 on

Offline VABird

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Also found that the rear axle drivers that JBQ sells will also fit and drive out the lower shock sleeve.