Author Topic: Full Circle  (Read 1311 times)

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November 14, 2019, 05:56:55 PM on

Offline Chris Canning (OP)

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See Triumph are just about to unveil a new 900 Tiger  :icon_wink:

November 14, 2019, 06:16:41 PMReply #1 on

Offline Mustang

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  • WTF !
    • K&L CYCLE
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looks kinda like the offspring of  a steamer and an 800 that  had a wild weekend  :mut

November 14, 2019, 07:37:05 PMReply #2 on

Offline Chris Canning (OP)

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When they do a 1300(at least) with 17” wheels count me in and i’ll Pay up front  :icon_lol: because with a garage full the one thing I have learned over the years my soul is in a 3 cylinder engine.

November 15, 2019, 10:59:11 AMReply #3 on

Offline Lee337

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Think I need to see it in the flesh, not too sure about it.
No matter how smart you are you can never convince someone stupid that they are stupid.

November 15, 2019, 12:47:03 PMReply #4 on

Offline Chris Canning (OP)

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Hopefully the Moto2 connection is going to take Triumph to great heights and I remain optimistic for the future and new bikes.

Like the tubeless rims on this new 900 as well :icon_wink:

November 17, 2019, 07:56:39 PMReply #5 on

Offline 93TigerBill-2016

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  • Returning Member: 20 years of Steamer Ownership.
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Quite a list:
- Separate/boltable rear subframe (won't write off the bike with a hit to the pillion peg frame);
- Tubeless wire wheels/XC - from the Scrambler 1200;
- Slipper clutch - from the Street Triple;
- Euro 5 compliant;
- Increased capacity - barrels from 675 - 855 cc?
- Suspension - Showa front, WP rear;l
- Brakes - Brembo;
-TFT Dash.

Should be interesting.......
'93 Triumph Tiger, Caspian Blue, Blue Engine Cases
132,000 km;  '12 Tiger 800XC Blk; IBA #45911

November 18, 2019, 10:02:39 PMReply #6 on

Offline Nick Calne

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oh no, my pcp is up in March and I have to choose a new bike...

November 19, 2019, 07:26:33 AMReply #7 on

Offline Chris Canning (OP)

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PCP..... oh no.

November 19, 2019, 01:25:53 PMReply #8 on

Offline London_Phil

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 The Blue Steamer is on PCP??????? That's a long contract.....

November 24, 2019, 08:16:13 PMReply #9 on

Offline Nick Calne

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Finishes just time to go from one 900 to the next Phil
.

November 24, 2019, 08:47:59 PMReply #10 on

Offline Nick Calne

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PCP is great Chris btw. Esp if you get paid sporadically like me.
Put some money down when you have it.
Small payments (useful when one is between pay events)
0% interest
When it's up either pay the remainder, give if back or chop it in for another bike.

What's not to like?

November 25, 2019, 07:16:49 AMReply #11 on

Offline London_Phil

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PCP seems to work for a lot of people.
My sister has no interest in anything but driving her cars, and is on her second Audi on PCP, she just uses it, puts it in the garage for services, and is very happy with they payments.
For people like me, who tend to keep things for years, it isn't really the thing, but I see the appeal.

November 25, 2019, 07:54:20 AMReply #12 on

Offline Chris Canning (OP)

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Sorry gents think PCP is just another bad trait of today’s society it’s just another form of renting and the only beneficiary is person/s renting it out that’s why they do it,and because folks do not have the ability to buy in the first place at the end of their PCP period they end up with nothing,what happened to the days of if you couldn’t afford to buy you went without until you could....

In your position Nick i’d Have thought with an intermittent cash flow even more reason to buy outright so in the hard times you are not paying out.

The same logic applies with house ownership when one comes to the end of a working life(As I have) its all about cash flow as in minimum,we are just coming to the end of our first 12 months of retirement financially we are better off than we were 10 years ago partially helped by never renting anything.

Sorry about the rant but our retirement is turning into something very special but it all hinges on money you put away in previous years.

November 28, 2019, 10:06:42 AMReply #13 on

Offline Tiger-G

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Sorry gents think PCP is just another bad trait of today’s society it’s just another form of renting and the only beneficiary is person/s renting it out that’s why they do it,and because folks do not have the ability to buy in the first place at the end of their PCP period they end up with nothing,what happened to the days of if you couldn’t afford to buy you went without until you could....

In your position Nick i’d Have thought with an intermittent cash flow even more reason to buy outright so in the hard times you are not paying out.

The same logic applies with house ownership when one comes to the end of a working life(As I have) its all about cash flow as in minimum,we are just coming to the end of our first 12 months of retirement financially we are better off than we were 10 years ago partially helped by never renting anything.

Sorry about the rant but our retirement is turning into something very special but it all hinges on money you put away in previous years.


Got to agree with Chris here, but I appreciate we are all different and have different circumstances.

To me, my motorbike and car are very personal things that mean everything to me. I want to be the owner of them, look after them properly, and I don't want to have to give them back to someone who has no connection with them at the end of some loan agreement and have nothing to show for my investment. I saved up to buy them both, no debt, no loan agreement, no nothing to show for them at the end of a certain length of time. It's the same for me in my recent retirement too, lived well within my means, never rented, invested in a good pension, now I own my own home, don't have a mortgage, am financially stable, don't owe anyone anything, can do anything I want when I want, and never have to work again at 52 years old  :icon_wink:

If more people lived within their means, saved up for what they needed, didn't live their life in debt, this country wouldn't be in the mess it's in !

(that's my rant over too  :icon_redface:)

Edit: I should add that I even had to buy my house twice when my bitch of an Ex left me and I had to buy her out  !!  :BangHead

Safe Riding.

Regards,
Graeme.

November 28, 2019, 02:17:13 PMReply #14 on

Offline Nick Calne

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I run my own business so I have tended get paid when it suits a range of other factors but it is normally frequently enough.  I have no mortgage too.  There are very few 'hard' times really and even then it is not too bad!  ...so far...  That said, if the politicians could please decide whether we are in our out of Europe it would be very helpful in avoiding uncertain times in my industry.

Having the PCP is not normally a significant economic burden (£78pcm for my bike) and if you decide to keep a bike it is actually a very reasonable method of purchase in some instances.  Part of what the younger generation is teaching us is that ownership (of depreciating assets) can be as much a bind as a pleasure, so I thought I would give a PCP a go.  So far, no problem, I may yet purchase the bike at the end of the PCP, I like it a lot.  I wouldn't rule it out as a method of enjoying a new bike for a few years without further obligation, whether you are retired or otherwise.

Finance wise - I am not sure if you did a net present value calc on the implications of a PCP vs outright purchase where you would end up, but I suspect it wouldn't be that different overall, as you tend to end up at the same point.  Possibly PCP would win as you aren't tying up as much of your capital.

That all said I have got 20+ until retirement, pensions, a business etc no real reason to work that hard, but I like my job a lot, I can see me doing it well into old age and just doing more other stuff when I want.  In fact I think I'll start that now.  Weather looks nice tomorrow, I think I'll go for a ride!

 :occasion14