Author Topic: Copper Canyon  (Read 3386 times)

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October 30, 2004, 09:18:42 PM on

Offline WildeKurt (OP)

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I recently got back from a trip from Chicago to the Barancas del Cobre (Copper Canyon) area of western Chihuahua Mexico.  For those unfamiliar with the area, it is located in the western Sierra Madres and is home to five or six spectacualr canyons one of which (Urique) is the deepest in North America.



The whole trip was jut under 5,000 miles and just over two weeks.  Some great riding, both paved and not during the trip.  Only one crash (in loose gravel) and only some minor damage (a broken foot peg and scratched paint).  The bike performed flawlessly but I must say it's bloody heavy and a serious handful off road even with the knobbies.



Speaking of knobbies, I used Conti TKC80's.  I put them on in Austin and the rear was bald by the time I got to Chicago (3K miles, maybe).  I don't think I'll bother with them again!  Too expensive for my blood.



Anyway, here's some pics, enjoy:



Dirty Tiger with knobbies:





Basisaichic Falls (tallest in Mexico)





Not me:





On the road to Batopilas:





Batopilas Canyon:









Me gassing up:





 

Somewhere in the Chihuahua desert:













The Rio Grand:


November 01, 2004, 10:33:55 PMReply #1 on

Offline newmanr19

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excellent! - how did it handle the non-premimum grade fuel down there?

November 05, 2004, 04:51:44 PMReply #2 on

Offline WildeKurt (OP)

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They have plenty of premium fuel in Mexico.  Occassionally in more rural locations you can only get Magna but I didn't notice any difference in ridablility between the two.  Maybe the gas mileage was off a bit,



Kurt

November 10, 2004, 03:26:15 AMReply #3 on

Offline Patrick the Scot

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At which border crossing did cross? And was it any trouble going through customs into Mexico, or is it still as loose as ever, I mean nothing that $20 couldn't handle?
"As far back as I can remember... I always wanted to be a gangster" - Good Fellas



Texas Tech Red Raiders - 2008 BIG IIX NCAAF CHAMPS

November 10, 2004, 02:59:41 PMReply #4 on

Sasquatch

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I would also like a little more detail about this trip as I want to plan one.  Could you fill us in with details about:



Boarder crossing:  What is needed (passport, ID, Mexican insurance, deposits, etc?) with prices and what you would do differently if you did it again?



Not speaking a lick of english except for requesting beer and wanting to see the waitresses boobs?



Anything else you can pass along to make the next visitor more comfortable?

November 13, 2004, 01:01:53 AMReply #5 on

Offline WildeKurt (OP)

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I crossed at Presidio/Ojinaga.  In the past I've crossed at Nuevo Laredo, Juarez and Columbus.  Ojinaga is the best by far, as in easiest.  All you need is a temporary import permit.  Insurance is optional (but recommended) and cheap.  For the permit you'll need proof of ownership (title, registration) a credit card or cash deposit, about $40 for a fee and a passport.  You can get it at the border or at a number of consulates in places like Chicago, San Antonio, San Diego, San Fransisco among others.  Either way, it's a piece of cake.



Riding in Mexico is no problem.  Actually, I prefer it to riding in the US.  People are more considerate and better drivers usually.  (Frankly, the typical driver in the US is a selfish butthead, IMHO).  Check out my website www.wildecompany.com for some info on a few trips I've done there.  Also, www.horizonsunlimited.com is a wealth of information about getting into and out of various countries around the world.  Be warned it a huge site, so finding info can sometimes take awhile but it's bound to be there somewhere.  Hope this all helps some.





BTW, some of my favorite roads in North America are in Mexico!



Kurt

November 24, 2004, 05:06:15 AMReply #6 on

Offline Patrick the Scot

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Does anybody know if Highway 16 going west out of Cuahtemoc (65 miles west of Chihuahua) is paved all the way over to Hermosillo?
"As far back as I can remember... I always wanted to be a gangster" - Good Fellas



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November 25, 2004, 12:49:39 AMReply #7 on

Offline WildeKurt (OP)

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Yes it is and from what I've been told it's a great ride but a bit rough in spots (no problem for a Tiger).  I haven't had the opportunity to do it as the only time I made it to the west of the Sierra Madre's was by dirt road.  BTW, a pretty good series of Mexico road maps is published by a company called International Travel Maps.  They have one of the whole country and serveral more in different sections.  They're the best I've seen thus far.





Kurt