Author Topic: Chain Adjustment for XC  (Read 2875 times)

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June 24, 2011, 02:24:28 PM on

Offline jphish (OP)

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To check for proper free movement the owners manual sez: "place the motorcycle on a level surface and hold it in an upright position with no weight on it" - So I assume they mean on centerstand ? Exact opposite of my Girly, where the say, check it on SIDESTAND, (yet picture in manual clearly shows it on centerstand). Appears Triumph has difficulty with clear instructions in English - go figure!  Anyway...  Just wondering.  :?:

June 25, 2011, 01:17:01 AMReply #1 on

Offline jphish (OP)

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Hmmm - probably why this site aint getting much traffic. Anyway - 4 responses on ADV rider within first hour of posting sez: check chain on 'side stand'. Just FYI

June 25, 2011, 04:30:14 AMReply #2 on

Offline walker

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your best bet is to get someone else to sit on the bike - see where the chain tightens up - and then figure out, on the sidestand or centerstand what the slack should be....

basically - have it tight enough it does not jump off the sprockets, but loose enough that it will not bind when the suspension moves through it's range of motion.

From your description, I would not expect it to be on the center stand. I would expect it to be exactly what it says - upright, with no weight on it (which is not a center stand).

Figure out where the range of motion is, and you'll be correct, regardless of what the manual says.

June 25, 2011, 01:54:51 PMReply #3 on

Offline jphish (OP)

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thanks Walker - With someone sitting on bike, I imagine it would take much of the slack out of the chain. After years of experience, most the Girly owners discovered she likes a lose chain (35-40 as per manual - but most run at 40-50mm) Not sure about the 800 yet. Spec sez 20-30mm - but that doesnt allow much rear suspension travel before it gets to the 'stops'. Perhaps loser is better here too. Or at least at the 30mm upper range, rather than lower ??

June 25, 2011, 02:36:06 PMReply #4 on

Offline Timbox2

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Im not a 800 owner, But I do know the 800's run a linkage on the rear suspension which is why you can have a tighter chain
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June 25, 2011, 09:36:45 PMReply #5 on

Offline jphish (OP)

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Thanks Timbox -  I DO own one - but didn't know that. Been alternating between my Girly & 800xc - VERY different machines! They share the tripple motor & name only - not much other similarities by way of handling, performance, ergos etc. Still like my Girly for the long haul (2,000+ mi trips) However: while I'm only 5'8" with the gel seat on 800 I can get 2/3rds of both my boots down...I feel tall! Also 800s need bar risers! - no matter how short one is - HUGE improvement. I'm getting to like the little tiger more over time. TTFN, j

June 27, 2011, 08:47:29 PMReply #6 on

Offline blacktiger

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Quote from: "Timbox2"
Im not a 800 owner, But I do know the 800's run a linkage on the rear suspension which is why you can have a tighter chain


I think you need to sit down and think that statement through. A linkage makes absolutely no difference to chain tension.

Actually, the reason the 800s chain slack is less than the Girlies is that the swingarm pivot is much closer to the drive sprocket.
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