TigerTriple.com

Talk => Speaking Of Bikes... => Topic started by: Chris Canning on November 14, 2019, 05:56:55 PM

Title: Full Circle
Post by: Chris Canning on November 14, 2019, 05:56:55 PM
See Triumph are just about to unveil a new 900 Tiger  :icon_wink:
Title: Re: Full Circle
Post by: Mustang on November 14, 2019, 06:16:41 PM
(https://mcn-images.bauersecure.com/PageFiles/675807/Triumph_Tiger_03.jpg)
looks kinda like the offspring of  a steamer and an 800 that  had a wild weekend  :mut
Title: Re: Full Circle
Post by: Chris Canning on November 14, 2019, 07:37:05 PM
When they do a 1300(at least) with 17” wheels count me in and i’ll Pay up front  :icon_lol: because with a garage full the one thing I have learned over the years my soul is in a 3 cylinder engine.
Title: Re: Full Circle
Post by: Lee337 on November 15, 2019, 10:59:11 AM
Think I need to see it in the flesh, not too sure about it.
Title: Re: Full Circle
Post by: Chris Canning on November 15, 2019, 12:47:03 PM
Hopefully the Moto2 connection is going to take Triumph to great heights and I remain optimistic for the future and new bikes.

Like the tubeless rims on this new 900 as well :icon_wink:
Title: Re: Full Circle
Post by: 93TigerBill-2016 on November 17, 2019, 07:56:39 PM
Quite a list:
- Separate/boltable rear subframe (won't write off the bike with a hit to the pillion peg frame);
- Tubeless wire wheels/XC - from the Scrambler 1200;
- Slipper clutch - from the Street Triple;
- Euro 5 compliant;
- Increased capacity - barrels from 675 - 855 cc?
- Suspension - Showa front, WP rear;l
- Brakes - Brembo;
-TFT Dash.

Should be interesting.......
Title: Re: Full Circle
Post by: Nick Calne on November 18, 2019, 10:02:39 PM
oh no, my pcp is up in March and I have to choose a new bike...
Title: Re: Full Circle
Post by: Chris Canning on November 19, 2019, 07:26:33 AM
PCP..... oh no.
Title: Re: Full Circle
Post by: London_Phil on November 19, 2019, 01:25:53 PM
 The Blue Steamer is on PCP??????? That's a long contract.....
Title: Re: Full Circle
Post by: Nick Calne on November 24, 2019, 08:16:13 PM
Finishes just time to go from one 900 to the next Phil
.
Title: Re: Full Circle
Post by: Nick Calne on November 24, 2019, 08:47:59 PM
PCP is great Chris btw. Esp if you get paid sporadically like me.
Put some money down when you have it.
Small payments (useful when one is between pay events)
0% interest
When it's up either pay the remainder, give if back or chop it in for another bike.

What's not to like?
Title: Re: Full Circle
Post by: London_Phil on November 25, 2019, 07:16:49 AM
PCP seems to work for a lot of people.
My sister has no interest in anything but driving her cars, and is on her second Audi on PCP, she just uses it, puts it in the garage for services, and is very happy with they payments.
For people like me, who tend to keep things for years, it isn't really the thing, but I see the appeal.
Title: Re: Full Circle
Post by: Chris Canning on November 25, 2019, 07:54:20 AM
Sorry gents think PCP is just another bad trait of today’s society it’s just another form of renting and the only beneficiary is person/s renting it out that’s why they do it,and because folks do not have the ability to buy in the first place at the end of their PCP period they end up with nothing,what happened to the days of if you couldn’t afford to buy you went without until you could....

In your position Nick i’d Have thought with an intermittent cash flow even more reason to buy outright so in the hard times you are not paying out.

The same logic applies with house ownership when one comes to the end of a working life(As I have) its all about cash flow as in minimum,we are just coming to the end of our first 12 months of retirement financially we are better off than we were 10 years ago partially helped by never renting anything.

Sorry about the rant but our retirement is turning into something very special but it all hinges on money you put away in previous years.
Title: Re: Full Circle
Post by: Tiger-G on November 28, 2019, 10:06:42 AM
Sorry gents think PCP is just another bad trait of today’s society it’s just another form of renting and the only beneficiary is person/s renting it out that’s why they do it,and because folks do not have the ability to buy in the first place at the end of their PCP period they end up with nothing,what happened to the days of if you couldn’t afford to buy you went without until you could....

In your position Nick i’d Have thought with an intermittent cash flow even more reason to buy outright so in the hard times you are not paying out.

The same logic applies with house ownership when one comes to the end of a working life(As I have) its all about cash flow as in minimum,we are just coming to the end of our first 12 months of retirement financially we are better off than we were 10 years ago partially helped by never renting anything.

Sorry about the rant but our retirement is turning into something very special but it all hinges on money you put away in previous years.


Got to agree with Chris here, but I appreciate we are all different and have different circumstances.

To me, my motorbike and car are very personal things that mean everything to me. I want to be the owner of them, look after them properly, and I don't want to have to give them back to someone who has no connection with them at the end of some loan agreement and have nothing to show for my investment. I saved up to buy them both, no debt, no loan agreement, no nothing to show for them at the end of a certain length of time. It's the same for me in my recent retirement too, lived well within my means, never rented, invested in a good pension, now I own my own home, don't have a mortgage, am financially stable, don't owe anyone anything, can do anything I want when I want, and never have to work again at 52 years old  :icon_wink:

If more people lived within their means, saved up for what they needed, didn't live their life in debt, this country wouldn't be in the mess it's in !

(that's my rant over too  :icon_redface:)

Edit: I should add that I even had to buy my house twice when my bitch of an Ex left me and I had to buy her out  !!  :BangHead

Title: Re: Full Circle
Post by: Nick Calne on November 28, 2019, 02:17:13 PM
I run my own business so I have tended get paid when it suits a range of other factors but it is normally frequently enough.  I have no mortgage too.  There are very few 'hard' times really and even then it is not too bad!  ...so far...  That said, if the politicians could please decide whether we are in our out of Europe it would be very helpful in avoiding uncertain times in my industry.

Having the PCP is not normally a significant economic burden (£78pcm for my bike) and if you decide to keep a bike it is actually a very reasonable method of purchase in some instances.  Part of what the younger generation is teaching us is that ownership (of depreciating assets) can be as much a bind as a pleasure, so I thought I would give a PCP a go.  So far, no problem, I may yet purchase the bike at the end of the PCP, I like it a lot.  I wouldn't rule it out as a method of enjoying a new bike for a few years without further obligation, whether you are retired or otherwise.

Finance wise - I am not sure if you did a net present value calc on the implications of a PCP vs outright purchase where you would end up, but I suspect it wouldn't be that different overall, as you tend to end up at the same point.  Possibly PCP would win as you aren't tying up as much of your capital.

That all said I have got 20+ until retirement, pensions, a business etc no real reason to work that hard, but I like my job a lot, I can see me doing it well into old age and just doing more other stuff when I want.  In fact I think I'll start that now.  Weather looks nice tomorrow, I think I'll go for a ride!

 :occasion14
Title: Re: Full Circle
Post by: Lee337 on November 28, 2019, 04:16:48 PM
I have to admit to thinking of getting an electric bike using PCP just for commuting, still keeping my current tiger for pleasure/touring etc if the figures stack up as I'm planning to go semi-retired in 3 years. I figure with my pension & a part time job I should be able to comfortably afford it & give it back before the batteries need replacing.

The downside is the increase in insurance and I'm still not sure about paying £xx monthly for 3 years just for the privilege of having a commuter toy only to give it back again.
Title: Re: Full Circle
Post by: Chris Canning on November 28, 2019, 08:57:03 PM
I remember some time back seeing a post by an American when he mentioned today’s biker doesn’t buy a bike anymore he/she buys an appliance which I thought was fairly cruel at time but maybe not so far from the truth.

I currently run 6 bikes non of them stock they are who I am part of my soul i’ve had my 955 18 years and another bike longer than that.

As for a pension oh blimey my pet subject over the last 18 months, never had a company one but I started a private one in 86 and for you guys in the UK approaching that age have a look at ‘Pension Wise’ they were an absolute mine of info,I/we have been retired for not quite 12 months and I still struggle with it,not that we haven’t got anything to do but way too much and now have to keep a bloody diary...... but the strangest thing of all money turns up in the bank every month and we do absolutely nothing for it.

What the current generation forget about modern day money it has never been cheaper to borrow our first mortgage in 79 was 16% interest here in the UK.

Non of which has anything to do with me wanting a chain driven 1300 Tiger with 17” wheels  :icon_biggrin:
Title: Re: Full Circle
Post by: Nick Calne on November 29, 2019, 09:20:24 AM
Ah Chris, the appliance thing is also about the nature of the physical product. Everything is more plastic less metal, less fixable, less adaptable, plug it into a laptop at the dealers. That's another reason people are less attached and think of non ownership models as a good thing.

Being a bit like you in having a newer and a very old bike you can compare very easily. My old tiger is a thing of substance at nearly 23 years old. Metal, solid, heavy.  It will take a few years of tinkering to engender the same feeling with the newbie.

Lee why not set out the costs over three years. You might find with the fuel cost savings of the bike that you actually save money by comparison.

...or at least that is a case you can make to the missus!
Title: Re: Full Circle
Post by: Lee337 on November 29, 2019, 11:09:14 AM
Well, initial costing of an electronic steed does not stack up, especially if buying one. factoring in how long current (see what I did there) technology batteries last & the cost of replacing them would cost more than I would save in not having to pay for petrol, Tax and any increase in insurance.

I know there is the option to rent the battery packs, especially in the car market, so you don't have to worry about the cost of replacement, but the cost when compared to existing fuel prices & MPG of my Tiger makes it more expensive to run an electric bike.

There's also the environmental impact that concerns me. My Tiger is 13 years old, My Blackbird was even older. Every year my Tiger is on the road, reduces the average cost per year in terms of initial cost to buy new and the environmental impact of making it in the first place. Electronic vehicles have a more limited lifespan, especially the batteries, around 300 - 400 charge cycles, they have a higher cost to manufacture, both financially and environmentally and cost more to recycle at the end of their life. While we still have carbon based power stations there are still emissions related to electronic vehicles albeit they've just been moved from the back of the vehicle to wherever the power station is.

So, getting back on topic, maybe I'll go have a look at that new Tiger 900 later today  :icon_lol:
Title: Re: Full Circle
Post by: HockleyBoy on December 04, 2019, 12:13:34 PM
https://advrider.com/triumph-debuts-five-new-models-for-tiger-900-line/ (https://advrider.com/triumph-debuts-five-new-models-for-tiger-900-line/)

For those that havent seen it