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Talk => Speaking Of Bikes... => Topic started by: Stretch on March 20, 2009, 10:41:36 PM

Title: More Tiger Wisdom... What NOT To Do...
Post by: Stretch on March 20, 2009, 10:41:36 PM
This thread is intended for folks to pass on little jewels of wisdom to others about what NOT to do when wrenching and modifying their Tigers.

Don't be bashful... we've all dropped nuts into intakes, poured three liters of expensive synthetic oil into an engine with no drain plug, and ridden across town after a tire change to discover the axle only hand-tight.

Here's one at Bixxer Bob's suggestion, regarding stuck throttles...

http://tigertriple.com/forum/index.php/topic,5792 (http://tigertriple.com/forum/index.php/topic,5792)
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Post by: HappyMan on March 20, 2009, 11:21:32 PM
Mmmmmmmm.  Nice post Stretch.  :eusa_clap


(http://s3.amazonaws.com/advrider/lurker.gif)
Title:
Post by: Bixxer Bob on March 21, 2009, 03:51:57 PM
Nice when an idea catches on!!!!  :wink:

Tiger Trax posted a message for Steamer owners on the same throttle-jamming subject further down the same post.
Title: What NOT to Do...
Post by: noivson on March 21, 2009, 10:18:01 PM
I'll be your Huckelberry...

 While adjusting shift lever, (new boots) might as well adjust the brake too,  while things are at hand. Loosen the mounting plate for the brake assembly to alter the linkage. Can't quite reach and work the jam nut. No problemo, just a few more turns and the screw is out. Second one Dooht! Do Not Remove while the bike is on the center stand.....
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Post by: Bixxer Bob on April 01, 2009, 08:15:54 PM
And here's another...

Those that spanner for a living know to remove rings, watches etc before they start.  Those that don't should consider it a good idea - at best it'll stop you scratching your precious paint at some point, at worst it'll save you from an accident.

Where it gets tricky is where "you're only going to do this five-minute job" and don't bother.

Today I discovered how a long screwdriver, lack of attention, lack of preparation (ie not removing my metal strap watch) led to a heart-stopping display of sparks when I was disconnecting my battery.  It could have been worse, for example if there'd been fuel or solvents around, but I DO know better.  It shouldn't have happened.  :oops:

No matter how small the job, take the time to think it through and be safe folks  :wink:
Title: Re: More Tiger Wisdom... What NOT To Do...
Post by: Woodz on June 15, 2009, 08:24:21 PM
Quote from: "Stretch"
This thread is intended for folks to pass on little jewels of wisdom to others about what NOT to do when wrenching and modifying their Tigers.

Don't be bashful... we've all dropped nuts into intakes, poured three liters of expensive synthetic oil into an engine with no drain plug, and ridden across town after a tire change to discover the axle only hand-tight.

Here's one at Bixxer Bob's suggestion, regarding stuck throttles...

http://tigertriple.com/forum/index.php/topic,5792 (http://tigertriple.com/forum/index.php/topic,5792)


May i just add that this happened to me as well,Scottoiler T piece jammed the throttle wide open and i came off in a big way at about 70mph resulting in 2 months off work and brown pants!

I urge everyone to check the T piece is tied out of the way,  :shock:
Title:
Post by: Bixxer Bob on June 16, 2009, 06:24:39 PM
Wrote to Scottoiler last night and got a very nice reply from them today.  To cut the long short,  they'll add a safety note to their fitting instructions to raise wareness of this potential problem.  Nice folks taking the time to listen!!  (http://www.cheesebuerger.de/images/smilie/froehlich/d055.gif)
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Post by: Stretch on June 16, 2009, 06:29:21 PM
Great!  Lives may be lengthened.
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Post by: Woodz on June 19, 2009, 02:39:24 PM
Quote from: "Bixxer Bob"
Wrote to Scottoiler last night and got a very nice reply from them today.  To cut the long short,  they'll add a safety note to their fitting instructions to raise wareness of this potential problem.  Nice folks taking the time to listen!!  (http://www.cheesebuerger.de/images/smilie/froehlich/d055.gif)


Brilliant  :D
Title: Brake bleeding - hall of shame
Post by: mnormand on July 17, 2009, 02:44:28 AM
Did my Suz DR650 two days ago, 1st time at bleeding brakes, no issues. Started with Actron vacuum kit, too much trouble trying to seal off all the air leaks,  just went with tube, jar manual process.  Well that wasn't so bad.  Test drive, works great, and better than before.

Tonight lets do the tiger.  Front no problem, even tho I forgot to do the other side ! LOL  (my first bike with dual fronts).
Move to back, where I removed the caliper from the swingarm lately awaiting new pads, should arrive tomorrow.  Proceed to bleed brakes, can't get any resistance when pumping peddle.   :shock:  Hour later *&^%$# try again tomorrow.  

Just stupidly realized minutes ago since the pistons were unrestricted, thats why I couldn't get any pressure.   :oops:

Hope this saves someone some trouble. I'll knock it out quickly tomorrow!   :D
Title:
Post by: zombie on October 08, 2009, 05:49:02 PM
And DO NOT forget to pump the front brakes after bleeding them so you don't roll out of your shop backwards with no brakes and proceed to run into a tree :oops:
Title:
Post by: Sin_Tiger on October 09, 2009, 01:24:02 AM
Quote from: "zombie"
so you don't roll out of your shop backwards with no brakes and proceed to run into a tree :oops:


 :ImaPoser  :ImaPoser don't suppose you had the video camera rolling  :oops:
Title:
Post by: scfrank on December 28, 2009, 02:23:56 AM
Quote from: "Bixxer Bob"
And here's another...

Those that spanner for a living know to remove rings, watches etc before they start.  Those that don't should consider it a good idea - at best it'll stop you scratching your precious paint at some point, at worst it'll save you from an accident.

Where it gets tricky is where "you're only going to do this five-minute job" and don't bother.

Today I discovered how a long screwdriver, lack of attention, lack of preparation (ie not removing my metal strap watch) led to a heart-stopping display of sparks when I was disconnecting my battery.  It could have been worse, for example if there'd been fuel or solvents around, but I DO know better.  It shouldn't have happened.  :oops:

No matter how small the job, take the time to think it through and be safe folks  :wink:



I second that. I had a friend that worked on his corvette, and welded his wedding ring to the chassis. His finger was in it. Not pretty.
Title:
Post by: REGULATOR on December 28, 2009, 12:24:41 PM
before you use any rag to wipe dust off your bike check it out.

   I had a bucket of microfiber rags for wiping dust off the bikes,  had my Sprint for sale and wanted it to look pristine since I had just waxed it a few days prior,  reached into the bucket and grabbed a "clean" microfiber dust rag, and lightly wipped the surface of the tank,  

   my clean rag had a metal shaving that had imbedded itself,  so it was razor sharp and left a nice big scratch on my shiny tank..sonafa

Ive also learned to wrap a rag around wrenches when working near body work.  ( always best to remove the body work or pad it though)

Ive slipped and gouged plastic panels before..
Title: The long and short of it
Post by: tazshido on February 07, 2010, 06:44:13 PM
Not sure about Triumphs (haven't taken possession of mine yet) but on my Virago I had to take the side case off to get to the starter gears. I would pull the (very soft) steel screws out and put them in a magnetic tool tray. It wasn't until I was getting ready to put the case back on that I realized the 16 screws were in 9 different lengths and each had to be put back in pretty much the exact hole it came out of. A 30 minute reassembly turned into a 3 hour puzzle.
Now I make a template out of cardboard and punch holes corisponding to the screw holes so they always go back in where they came out of.
Title: Re: The long and short of it
Post by: iansoady on February 08, 2010, 11:18:15 AM
Quote from: "tazshido"
It wasn't until I was getting ready to put the case back on that I realized the 16 screws were in 9 different lengths and each had to be put back in pretty much the exact hole it came out of. A 30 minute reassembly turned into a 3 hour puzzle.


Been there done it. An easy way to check is to put the cover on and use a depth gauge on a vernier caliper (or just a stout bit of wire) to check the depth of each hole. Only takes a few minutes. The holes will be slightly deeper than the under-head length of the screws.
Title:
Post by: akey on September 19, 2010, 11:34:36 AM
Heres one,

If your throttle slowly gets stiffer, dont ignore it...........

I did and then my throttle cable snapped - I know I know its a school boy error on my part  :cry:
Title: aaaaarrgggg!!!!
Post by: hooligan971 on September 27, 2010, 01:01:42 AM
This morning I spent about an hour, setting up a jig to adjust the height and angle of the boxes. I tried several different positions, and decided on one that I thought looked best and would work out with dry bags,tent, top box/bag etc. and not get in the way of any passenger.
I carefully marked and drilled the left box. Mounted it and stood back to admire my handy work. Looked great ! The whole operation went smooth and easy and if the other side was that easy I was good to go :D
Moved the jig over to the right side (exhaust side) and grabbed the box from the packaging and immediately realized I was right to think the project was going too easy to be true. I had ordered the cliff-cut set :BangHead  and with these, you are pretty limited on the angle that you can mount them, and this one was no way gonna' go on to match the other side that I thought I'd done such a good job getting just right. So I went ahead and mounted that box, removed the other and re-drilled it to match (wasn't that much different) and now I need to find a few auto body plugs to fit the holes.
All in all even with the screw up, it took only about an hour and a half, and turned out fine in the end.
Hopefully my mistake will help others who have to drill their own mounting holes. If you get clif-cut boxes, mount the exhaust side first. :roll:
Title: Virgin lub'ed in
Post by: slomotion on October 30, 2010, 07:18:07 AM
Well its has been a year of living with a steamer so.. :new_all_coholic
Carbs.
1. Manifold rubbers are wider at the top than the bottom.
2.Remember to fully check that all little bits are in place.
3.Do not drop coil mount bolt.  :BangHead
So after four off and ons with a bit of lub'.Carb' virgin l'm not.
Jut a fumbling novice now.
:icon_study
Title:
Post by: Bixxer Bob on October 30, 2010, 12:09:48 PM
Your emoticon skills are a bit hit and miss too :ImaPoser
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Post by: Mustang on October 30, 2010, 01:52:28 PM
Quote from: "Bixxer Bob"
Your emoticon skills are a bit hit and miss too :ImaPoser
fixt em
Title: Torx and other tools
Post by: Colonel Nikolai on November 17, 2010, 12:01:25 AM
Lot of you know this already, I almost learned the hard way. Tonight I was in the process of removing a cam cap on my 96 Sprint. The bolts are T-30 torx that you have to use an L-Shaped wrench to get under the spine tube part of the frame. Got one of them loosened OK. The second one was giving me grief. After struggling with it a bit I noticed the wrench just wouldn't seat properly. Looking at the end of the wrench, I found  it had twisted!. It was a brand called Titan that I got at Northern Tool. I threw the whole set into the garbage and ordered a new set from Snapon. Much cheaper in the long run.

(http://www.hand-tools.us/images/pictures/titan-tamperresistant-torx-keys-13pc-set-model-12715.jpg)

When you're wrenching on the bike especially with high-stressed fasteners, don't skimp on the tools or you could end up with fasteners like this:

(http://blog.mtbguru.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/02/CIMG4014-1.jpg)
Title: WARNING: Our Bikes Are Made of Aluminium: SOFT
Post by: Colonel Nikolai on November 17, 2010, 12:14:45 AM
When removing the valve cover on these bikes be VERY VERY careful of especially tightening the valve cover bolts. They can strip with hardly any resistance. The torque setting on these are 10nm, only a bit more than finger-tight. I did this using only one hand and it felt like I was crushing a ripe grape:

(http://lh5.ggpht.com/_bNWCp21GtiE/TN8MXS3w5lI/AAAAAAAAAfs/1-Q9nE3Jisc/s400/IMG_20101113_160620.jpg)

Be very afraid closing the valve cover.
Title: do not pressure wash the suspesion linkage
Post by: Colonel Nikolai on December 06, 2010, 02:41:28 AM
Do not pressure-wash the suspension linkage. A mechanic told me this. The water breaches the seals of the suspension and causes corrosion. Goes for any bike not just tigers.
Title:
Post by: Mustang on December 06, 2010, 11:57:39 AM
ruins oring chains too  :wink:
Title:
Post by: fishguts on March 22, 2011, 02:16:25 PM
Quote from: "zombie"
And DO NOT forget to pump the front brakes after bleeding them so you don't roll out of your shop backwards with no brakes and proceed to run into a tree :oops:
Is that why there's no trees outside your shop.   Heh heh heh.
Title:
Post by: Danny955i on July 29, 2011, 04:50:53 AM
1. When you remove a Girly tank, lean it up against a wall with the battery base on the ground and lobes against the wall... this will prevent distortion due to resting on the bottom, ESPECIALLY in the heat.

2. DO NOT use torx bits in allen bolts, you will destroy them and an allen wrench will no longer work in them.

3. Zip-tie/safety wire your blue-clips onto your coil packs on your 955i... running home on 2 cylinders thinking that you blew your motor up with TuneECU is not fun.

4. It is OK to put grease on everything, EXCEPT: Brakes, controls, seat, tires, foot pegs, foot controls, passenger pegs, or painted surfaces.

5. Loc-tite should be used sparingly, and if you think "Won't I need to remove that at some point?" use the BLUE loc-tite, NOT the red.
Title:
Post by: atokad on February 27, 2012, 06:18:22 PM
After removing the 8mm nut that holds your gauges into the dash be sure to grab the little black washer and rubber grommet that are behind that 8 mm nut before you pull the gauge out of its "socket".

Otherwise, one of them might fall off, hit your foot and roll away.  Then you won't spend an hour looking for the dam thing to find out that it rolled all the way from the front of the garage, under one of your vehicles, out the garage and half way down the driveway before becoming lodged in one of the expansion joints in the driveway.

Oh, and you won't need your wife to be the one that found it clear out there because you refused to believe it had enough mass and momentum to actually roll "that far"!  :oops:
Title: Re: More Tiger Wisdom... What NOT To Do...
Post by: Jon H. on December 18, 2012, 04:57:05 PM
Take great care when removing/replacing the battery box mounting bolts into the plastic fuel tank.  It doesn't take much force to break the embedded nut free and will likely result in a fuel leak.  Use anti-sieze on the threads.
Title: Re: More Tiger Wisdom... What NOT To Do...
Post by: Geoff W on January 17, 2013, 05:51:19 PM
Do NOT apply Hammerite paint in Sub Zero temperatures..............A friend of mine straightened my side stand using heat and blunt instruments. So I put two coats of red oxide on it, then a couple of days later painted it with some black Hammerite I had lying around in the garage. Daytime temperature in my garage recently has been -2 C and about -5 or colder at night. The Hammerite just would not cure, I ended up with great thick gooey runs of the stuff all over the stand. I brought it into the house overnight and now I have a Hammerite coated stand that looks like a gnarled piece of old wood, but at least it is straight!
Title: Re: More Tiger Wisdom... What NOT To Do...
Post by: Bixxer Bob on January 17, 2013, 08:45:42 PM
Nice one, Geoff.  It does say something about temp on the tin :hat10
Title: Re: More Tiger Wisdom... What NOT To Do...
Post by: Geoff W on January 21, 2013, 10:08:22 PM
Real men don't read instructions.........besides there was paint all over the tin and loads of other lame excuses.
Title: Re: More Tiger Wisdom... What NOT To Do...
Post by: Bixxer Bob on January 21, 2013, 10:11:11 PM
Real men don't read instructions.........

 :hat10
Title: Re: More Tiger Wisdom... What NOT To Do...
Post by: nickjtc on February 17, 2014, 08:46:05 PM
When installing directional tyres make sure you check twice before mounting them. :augie And even though it is usually obvious which way the wheels fit on the bike I always put a directional arrow on the disc as an extra reminder for the way the tyre should be mounted..
Title: Re: More Tiger Wisdom... What NOT To Do...
Post by: Sin_Tiger on February 18, 2014, 06:09:45 AM
Good tip  :thumbsup
Title: Re: More Tiger Wisdom... What NOT To Do...
Post by: Spud on March 20, 2014, 02:53:34 PM
When installing directional tyres make sure you check twice before mounting them. :augie :augie  And even though it is usually obvious which way the wheels fit on the bike I always put a directional arrow on the disc as an extra reminder for the way the tyre should be mounted..

Yeah could of told me before  :icon_redface:  :augie  lesson learnt

cheers Spud  :thumbsup
Title: Re: More Tiger Wisdom... What NOT To Do...
Post by: rex007can on May 02, 2014, 08:03:25 PM
There's directional tires???
 :bug_eye


 :icon_lol: :icon_lol:
Title: Re: More Tiger Wisdom... What NOT To Do...
Post by: TT on September 22, 2014, 10:51:40 PM
Make sure the spare Grey DIN plug is secured on the injectors loom, or it may get stuck under the throttle return mechanism like itbdid with me yesterday
Title: Re: More Tiger Wisdom... What NOT To Do...
Post by: Bixxer Bob on September 23, 2014, 12:08:22 PM
Jam open?  I had that happen,  quite a lot of  :bug_eye  before I got it stopped....
Title: Re: More Tiger Wisdom... What NOT To Do...
Post by: nickjtc on September 23, 2014, 02:22:06 PM
Make sure the spare Grey DIN plug is secured on the injectors loom, or it may get stuck under the throttle return mechanism like itbdid with me yesterday

Time to change the underwear after an event like that, perhaps............
Title: Re: More Tiger Wisdom... What NOT To Do...
Post by: TT on September 23, 2014, 06:01:37 PM
Had my 9 year old daughter on the back to, just had the engine out to respray it, and never secured the sod, what's it for anyway, plugs in to nowt.

Don't wear underwear.
Title: Re: More Tiger Wisdom... What NOT To Do...
Post by: Bixxer Bob on September 23, 2014, 10:27:26 PM
The plug is for the California model; part of the emmisions control for that model.
Title: Re: More Tiger Wisdom... What NOT To Do...
Post by: nickjtc on August 04, 2015, 02:13:30 PM
Pick up a new (to you) motorcycle and be so dazzled by its innate beauty and charisma that you do not perform a perfunctory pre-ride inspection. Then ride it for 300kms (some in a sporting manner on roads with no shoulder and a several hundred foot drop off) before wondering what the tools in the tool kit will actually be useful for.

Then find out that the big ring spanner fits the rear axle nut, but that the nut is not even finger tight!! :bug_eye
Title: Re: More Tiger Wisdom... What NOT To Do...
Post by: nickjtc on August 04, 2015, 02:15:05 PM
Buy Dealertool when Tune ECU does exactly the same thing for nowt outlay.

Edit: UNLESS you have ABS brakes and want to do a 'full' bleed, in which case Dealertool helps.
Title: Re: More Tiger Wisdom... What NOT To Do...
Post by: Bixxer Bob on August 04, 2015, 08:19:36 PM
Nice one Nick  :thumbsup
Title: Re: More Tiger Wisdom... What NOT To Do...
Post by: trophydave on August 09, 2015, 07:27:44 PM
When you unbolt the R/R to change it and drop one of the bolts dont assume that it has landed on the floor and you will find it later.I found it when I tried to push the bike out of the garage and it only moved a few inches then stopped.The bolt had landed on top of the chain and was stuck behind the front sprocket cover.
Title: Re: More Tiger Wisdom... What NOT To Do...
Post by: nickjtc on August 11, 2015, 12:20:42 AM
The bolt had landed on top of the chain and was stuck behind the front sprocket cover.

Funny how bits that fall off seem to migrate to the most unusual nooks and crannies, isn't it?
Title: Re: More Tiger Wisdom... What NOT To Do...
Post by: Sasquatch on November 16, 2015, 06:53:25 PM
It is frustrating to have to have 2-3 sets of tools to take off one part.  Triumph loves to use Torx, Allen (Socket Head Cap Screws) and regular hex all over the bike.  For the first few years every time I would have something apart I would go to the local hardware store and replace all the torx fasteners with socket head (allen).  It makes taking the bike apart much less frustrating.
Title: Re: More Tiger Wisdom... What NOT To Do...
Post by: nickjtc on November 16, 2015, 07:36:07 PM
.... every time I would have something apart I would go to the local hardware store and replace all the torx fasteners with socket head (allen).  It makes taking the bike apart much less frustrating.

+1. Torx = the spawn of the devil imho.  :icon_lol: Nothing nicer than dealing with a simple hex or allen head  bolt.
Title: Re: More Tiger Wisdom... What NOT To Do...
Post by: MikeBenzon on November 21, 2015, 04:26:39 AM
Yesterday I was removing the air box and the little wire retainer the holds the connector on the front right side fell downward. I searched for a half hour with no luck. Then I got a flashlight and a magnet and found it under the starter motor.
Title: Re: More Tiger Wisdom... What NOT To Do...
Post by: Bixxer Bob on November 22, 2015, 07:18:07 PM
Yesterday I was removing the air box and the little wire retainer the holds the connector on the front right side fell downward. I searched for a half hour with no luck. Then I got a flashlight and a magnet and found it under the starter motor.

Lucky guy, I never found mine, it's now held in with locking wire..... :icon_rolleyes: